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Archive - Apr 21, 2009

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Gene Signature Associated with Gleevec Resistance in GIST Patients

A genetic signature associated with increased resistance to Gleevec in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) has been identified by researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Efforts to affect the expression and/or activity of genes in the signature may help increase the responsiveness to Gleevec in resistant patients. Currently, approximately 80% of GIST patients are responsive to Gleevec. This work was presented at the annual AACR meeting April 18-22. [Press release]

Clues to Mechanism of Lithium Action in Bipolar Disease

New research provides insights into how lithium works in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder, and may lay the groundwork for advances in the treatment of this disease. Scientists from Cardiff University, together with colleagues, have shown that lithium inhibits the enzyme inositol monophosphatase, and this leads to the inhibition of the production of PIP3, a molecule that is important in controlling brain cell signaling. Professor Adrian Harwood of Cardiff School of Biosciences, who led the research, said "We still cannot say definitively how lithium can help stabilize bipolar disorder. However, our research does suggest a possible pathway for its operation. By better understanding lithium, we can learn about the genetics of bipolar disorder and develop more potent and selective drugs. Further, altered PIP3 signalling is linked to other disorders, including epilepsy and autism, so this well established drug could be used to treat other conditions." The research was published in Disease Models & Mechanisms. [Press release]