Syndicate content

Archive - Apr 2, 2018

Date

Link Between Eating Red Meat & Distal Colon Cancer Seen inn UK Women

A new study suggests that a diet free from red meat significantly reduces the risk of a type of colon cancer in women living in the United Kingdom. University of Leeds researchers were part of an international team that assessed whether red meat, poultry, fish, or vegetarian diets are associated with risk of colon and rectal cancer. When comparing the effects of these diets to cancer development in specific subsites of the colon, they found that those regularly eating red meat compared to a red meat-free diet had higher rates of distal colon cancer -- cancer found on the descending section of the colon, where feces are stored. Lead author Dr. Diego Rada Fernandez de Jauregui is part of the Nutritional Epidemiology Group (NEG) at Leeds, and the University of the Basque Country in Spain. He said: "The impact of different types of red meat and dietary patterns on cancer locations is one of the biggest challenges in the study of diet and colorectal cancer. Our research is one of the few studies looking at this relationship and while further analysis in a larger study is needed, it could provide valuable information for those with family history of colorectal cancer and those working on prevention." More than 2.2 million new cases of colorectal cancer, also known as bowel cancer, are expected worldwide by 2030. It is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in UK women. Previous studies have suggested that eating lots of red and processed meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer and it is estimated that around 1 in 5 bowel cancers in the UK are linked to eating these meats. However, there is limited available information about specific dietary patterns and the site of cancer occurrence in the bowel.

Cat-Like “Hearing” Achieved with Device Tens of Trillions Times Smaller Than Human Eardrum

Case Western Reserve University researchers have achieved cat-like “hearing” with a device 10,000,000,000,000 times smaller than human eardrum. The researchers are developing atomically thin "drumheads" able to receive and transmit signals across a radio frequency range far greater than what we can hear with the human ear. But the drumhead is tens of trillions times smaller in volume and 100,000 times thinner than the human eardrum. The advances will likely contribute to making the next generation of ultralow-power communications and sensory devices smaller and with greater detection and tuning ranges. "Sensing and communication are key to a connected world," said Philip Feng, PhD, an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and corresponding author on a paper about the work published in the March 30, 2018 issue of Science Advances. The article is titled “Electrically Tunable Single- and Few-Layer Mos2 Nanoelectromechanical Systems With Broad Dynamic Range.” "In recent decades, we have been connected with highly miniaturized devices and systems, and we have been pursuing ever-shrinking sizes for those devices." The challenge with miniaturization: Also achieving a broader dynamic range of detection, for small signals, such as sound, vibration, and radio waves. "In the end, we need transducers that can handle signals without losing or compromising information at both the 'signal ceiling' (the highest level of an undistorted signal) and the 'noise floor' (the lowest detectable level)," Dr. Feng said. While this work was not geared toward specific devices currently on the market, researchers said, it was focused on measurements, limits, and scaling which would be important for essentially all transducers. Those transducers may be developed over the next decade, but for now, Dr.