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Archive - May 3, 2018

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NIH Will Launch Hugely Ambitious “All of Us” Research Program on May 6; Program Seeks to Enroll One Million Volunteers from Diverse & Traditionally Under-Represented Backgrounds to Participate in Innovative Effort to Advance Precision Medicine

On Sunday, May 6, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will open national enrollment for the All of Us Research Program (https://www.joinallofus.org/en) a momentous effort to advance individualized prevention, treatment, and care for people of all backgrounds. People ages 18 and older, regardless of health status, will be able to enroll. The official launch date will be marked by community events (https://launch.joinallofus.org/) in seven cities across the country, as well as an online event. Volunteers will join more than 25,000 participants already enrolled in All of Us as part of a year-long beta test to prepare for the program’s national launch. The overall aim is to enroll 1 million or more volunteers and over-sample communities that have been underrepresented in research to make the program the largest, most diverse resource of its kind. “All of Us is an ambitious project that has the potential to revolutionize how we study disease and medicine,” Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said. “NIH’s unprecedented effort will lay the scientific foundation for a new era of personalized, highly effective health care. We look forward to working with people of all backgrounds to take this major step forward for our nation’s health.” Precision medicine is an emerging approach to disease treatment and prevention that considers differences in people’s lifestyles, environments, and biological makeup, including genes. With eyeglasses and hearing aids, we have long had customized solutions to individual needs. More recently, treating certain types of cancer is now possible with therapies targeted to patients’ DNA. Still, there are many unanswered questions leaving individuals, their families, their communities, and the health care community without good options.