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Key Gene Identified in Deadliest Breast Cancer

Scientists have identified a key gene in the pathogenesis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), which is the most lethal form of primary breast cancer, often striking women in the prime of life and causing death within 18 to 24 months. The disease-related gene is eIF4GI, a translation initiation factor. Researchers found that this gene is overexpressed in the majority of IBC patients and enables the formation of small, highly mobile clusters of cells (tumor emboli) that are responsible for the rapid metastasis that makes IBC such an effective killer. "The tragedy of IBC is that it is often misdiagnosed and misclassified,” said Dr. Robert Schneider, senior author of the report. “Rather than presenting as a “typical” lump, IBC looks like an inflammation of the breast and is frequently mistaken for an infection. Physicians often prescribe antibiotics, losing valuable time for treating this fast-moving killer." He noted that while IBC accounts for just several percent of all breast cancer cases, it takes a disproportionately high toll in mortality and has an incidence that is 50 percent higher in African American women. He added that there has been little progress in treating IBC over the past two decades, and there are no drugs specifically for this form of cancer. The new findings on eIF4GI could lead to the identification of new approaches, therapies, and a new class of drugs to target and treat IBC. This would be a critical development in the fight against IBC, which responds poorly to chemotherapy, radiation, or any other current treatments for breast cancer, Dr. Schneider noted. This research, conducted by scientists at New York University and George Washington University, was reported online in Nature Cell Biology on June 14. [Press release] [Nature Cell Biology abstract]