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Personalized Medicine Conference on Next-Gen Sequencing for Targeted Therapeutics

The sixth annual Personalized Medicine Conference (6.0) organized by San Francisco State University will focus on the amazing technological challenges and advances of “next-generation sequencing,” examining the very latest approaches and how they are leading to profound changes in our understanding of basic biological questions and to more efficacious and cost-effective therapies. The conference is entitled, “Next-Generation Sequencing for Targeted Therapeutics.” Featured speakers include Kimberly J. Popovits, Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer & President of Genomic Health; Dr. Mark Sliwkowski, Distinguished Staff Scientist at Genentech; Professor Atul Butte of Stanford University; and Dr. Carl Borrebaeck, Professor & Chair of Immunotechnology and Director of CREATE Health at Lund University in Sweden. The conference will take place at the South San Francisco Conference Center (http://www.ssfconf.com/directions-top) from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm on Thursday, May 30, 2013, with a reception to follow. Those wishing to attend are urged to register as soon as possible (http://personalizedmedicine.sfsu.edu/register.html). For additional information, to help sponsor the event, or to inquire about special academic rates, contact dnamed@sfsu.edu. The conference organizers, including Michael Goldman, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of San Francisco State’s Department of Biology, noted that with the price of sequencing a complete human genome falling into the $1,000 range, stunning advances are sure to come over the next few years. It is likely that a detailed genome sequence will soon be part of a routine medical history, allowing unprecedented precision in diagnosis and treatment. The DNA and RNA signatures of both complex, common diseases and rare, elusive conditions will yield their secrets. With regard to the overarching theme of personalized medicine, the organizers noted that this approach seeks to use genetic variation to develop new diagnostic tests and treatments and to identify the sub-groups of patients for whom these tests and treatments will work best. In addition, personalized medicine can also help determine which groups of patients are more prone to developing some diseases and, ideally, help with the selection of lifestyle changes and/or treatments that can delay onset of disease or reduce its impact. This approach, they say, is poised to transform healthcare over the next several decades, offering the possibility of improved health outcomes and making healthcare more cost-effective. The organizers urge you to come witness the latest in transformational personalized medicine technologies. Sponsors of the conference include Genentech, BIOMARIN, 3000 Swedish Biomimetics, LabCorp, and Celgene, among others. [Registration] [Conference program] [Conference overview]