Syndicate content

Familial Mutation Identified in African-Americans with Prostate Cancer

The first inherited mutation in African-American men with a family history of prostate cancer has been identified by researchers from Louisiana State University. "We detected this mutation only in African-American men with prostate cancer," noted senior author Dr. Shahriar Koochekpour. "We found it in the cell's androgen receptor (AR), a protein which interacts and responds to male sex hormones. This protein is profoundly involved in prostate cancer formation and its progression to an advanced metastatic, incurable stage. We believe that this mutation increases the risk of the development and progression of prostate cancer, in part by altering the receptor's DNA-binding ability, and by regulating the activities of other genes and proteins involved in the growth and aggressive behavior of tumors. We are hopeful that this discovery will eventually lead to a simple genetic test for prostate cancer for African-American men who are at high risk for developing prostate cancer, allowing genetic counseling and earlier, potentially life-saving treatment.” The authors noted that additional studies will be required to define the frequency and contribution of the mutation to early-onset and/or familial prostate cancer in African Americans. African-American men have a higher incidence and death rate from prostate cancer, as well as clinically more aggressive disease than Caucasians. According to the American Cancer Society's most current data for 2009-2010, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among American men. Between 2001 and 2005, the prostate cancer incidence rate was 59% higher in African-American men. African-American men also have the highest mortality rate for prostate cancer of any racial or ethnic group in the United States. The death rate for prostate cancer is 2.4 times higher in African-American men than in white men in the United States. The new mutation research was published online on February 22, 2010 in the Nature Publishing Group’s Asian Journal of Andrology. [Press release] [AJA article]