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Banana Compound Blocks HIV

A potent new inhibitor of HIV infection, derived from bananas, may open the door to new treatments to prevent sexual transmission of HIV, according to a University of Michigan Medical School study. The research team discovered that BanLec, a lectin in bananas, can inhibit HIV infection by binding to the sugar-rich HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120, and blocking the virus’s entry to the body. In laboratory tests, BanLec was as potent as two current anti-HIV drugs. Based on their findings, the researchers believe that BanLec may become a less expensive new component of applied vaginal microbicides. New ways of stopping the spread of the HIV are vitally needed. The rate of new infections of HIV is outpacing the rate of new individuals getting anti-retroviral drugs by 2.5 to1, and, at present, it appears an effective vaccine is years away. "HIV is still rampant in the U.S. and the explosion in poorer countries continues to be a bad problem because of tremendous human suffering and the cost of treating it," said the study’s senior author Dr. David Markovitz, professor of internal medicine at the medical school. Although condom use is quite effective, condoms are most successful in preventing infection if used consistently and correctly, which is often not the case. "That's particularly true in developing countries where women have little control over sexual encounters, so development of a long-lasting, self-applied microbicide is very attractive," Dr. Markovitz said. Co-author Michael Swanson, a doctoral student at the medical school, is developing a process to molecularly alter BanLec to enhance its potential clinical utility. Clinical use is considered years away, but researchers say even modest success could save millions of lives. Other investigators have estimated that 20 percent coverage with a microbicide that is only 60 percent effective against HIV might prevent up to 2.5 million HIV infections in three years. The results of the Michigan study were published in the March 19, 2010 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. [Press release] [JBC abstract]