Syndicate content

Synthetic Mimic of Abscisic Acid May Protect Crops from Drought

Scientists have identified a synthetic chemical that has the potential to be used in a spray to protect crops that are facing drought conditions. The chemical is pyrabactin and it mimics abscisic acid (ABA), which is a plant stress hormone that helps crops survive stressful conditions such as drought. For years, scientists have contemplated spraying ABA directly onto crops to enhance their protection in times of stress. But ABA is a costly, complicated, and light-sensitive molecule that has not found use in agriculture. "We screened thousands of chemicals for one that mimics ABA,” said the senior author of the study. “We found pyrabactin activates some of the ABA receptors in plants and is an excellent mimic of ABA. Moreover, unlike ABA, it is stable and easy to make. It therefore suggests a highly effective chemical strategy for improving plants' ability to survive under low-water conditions, potentially benefiting farmers in drought-prone areas worldwide.” The researchers also used the pyrabactin molecule to fish out an ABA receptor, believed to be the first such receptor to be definitively identified. This work was published online in the April 30 issue of Science Express. [Press release] [Science Express abstract]