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Hormone Addition May Solve Pod Shattering Problem in Oilseed Rape

Experiments in the related plant Arabidopsis suggest that artificial production of the hormone auxin in a specific region of the plant can prevent pod shattering and seed loss in brassica plants such as oilseed rape. Oilseed rape is grown for its tiny black oil-containing seeds, prized for cooking oil and margarines low in saturated fat, and increasingly for biodiesel. The meal that remains after oil extraction is also used as a high protein animal feed. Just before harvest, oilseed rape pods are prone to shatter, causing a 10-25% loss of seeds and up to 70% in some cases. Brassica plants normally disperse their seeds by a pod-shattering mechanism. Although this mechanism is an advantage in nature, it is one of the biggest problems in farming oilseed rape. As well as losing valuable seeds, it results in runaway 'volunteer' seedlings that contaminate the next crop in the rotation cycle. If rape seeds are harvested early to circumvent the problem, immature seeds may be collected which are of an inferior quality. This work is published in the May 28 issue of Nature. [Press release] [Nature abstract]