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Active Microenvironment May Provide Treatment Targets for Prostate Cancer

In a study of the response of prostate stroma (the surrounding structural framework of the prostate gland) to prostate cancer, researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine have identified 1,141 genes whose expression is altered in this response. Among the gene expression changes are ones that induce the formation of new structures such as blood vessels, nerves, and parts of nerves. These changes may explain why men with reactive stroma face a more aggressive disease, said Dr. Michael Ittmann, a senior author of the report. "Often in prostate cancer, you don't see much change in the stromal cells," said Dr. Ittmann. "However, in this subgroup of patients (in which the stroma become visibly reactive), you see a histologically recognizable change in the appearance of the stroma. Dr. (Gustavo) Ayala (another senior author of the report) has shown previously that this correlates with a bad prognosis. We know the stroma are doing something to promote bad behavior in cancer cells." "These findings are very important as this is the first step in discovering pathways and mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that could be targeted as a novel therapeutic approach to treat prostate cancer by treating the cancer microenvironment niche,” said Dr. David Rowley, another author of the report, which was published in Clinical Cancer Research. [Press release]