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New Angiogenesis Target Discovered

A new angiogenesis-promoting growth factor has been identified by researchers at the University of North Carolina and collaborating institutions. The newly identified growth factor protein, SFRP2, was found in the blood vessels of numerous tumor sites, including breast, prostate, lung, pancreas, ovarian, colon, kidney, and angiosarcomas. “The discovery that SFRP2 stimulates angiogenesis and is present in blood vessels of a wide variety of tumors provides us with a new target for drug design,” said Dr Nancy Klauber-DeMore, the senior author of the study. One growth factor that causes angiogenesis has been previously identified--vascular endothelial growth factor or VEGF--and drugs to inhibit VEGF are already in use. But not all tumors respond to the therapy initially or over the long term. Thus, new growth factors need to be identified to aid in developing the next generation of angiogenesis inhibitors. The current work was reported online in Cancer Research. [Press release]