Syndicate content

Four New Targets (LPA Pathway) for Breast Cancer Therapies

Researchers at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have identified four related new potential targets for breast cancer therapies. These potential targets are three lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors (LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3) and the LPA-producing enzyme, autotoxin (ATX). "Lysophosphatidic acid is the single most potent known cellular survival factor," said senior author Dr. Gordon Mills. It binds to a series of G protein-coupled receptors to spark normal cell proliferation, viability, production of growth factors, and survival. The current research shows that this powerful network is hijacked to initiate breast cancer and fuel tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. The authors show that breast cancer-resistant mice, when engineered to overexpress any one of the four molecules, develop invasive and metastatic mammary cancers. “We've compiled lots of evidence that they (LPA1, LPA2, LPA3, and ATX) are associated with cancer; what's been missing is proof that they could cause cancer. There are no questions left; they should be targeted." A number of drugs that target the receptors and ATX are currently in preclinical development, Dr. Mills said. "Now we have transgenic mouse models to test drugs to go forward against these targets." The current research was published in the June edition of Cancer Cell. [Press release] [Cancer Cell abstract]